Archive

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextMusic is fun and very much alive at Cargilfield
image/cms/resources/20190110142751.jpg
imageAltMusic
leftColBody

Singing Games as part of the Music Curriculum

Over the last year, one of the things that I have been introducing to children of all ages at Cargilfield are singing games from a series of books published by Linda Geoghegan, who I was fortunate to have a training session with last January.

As you can imagine, practical musical training sessions can be a little nerve-wracking at times for teachers as we don’t want to look stupid! Picture the scene: the Heads of Music from pretty much all the independent schools in Edinburgh, some of us left handed, some right handed and many of us with an inferiority complex where coordination is concerned, standing in small circles with chopsticks trying to sing and pass them around in a complicated pattern that fits with the words – mayhem, lots of dropped sticks and lots of laughter! Linda really challenged us all with the tasks she gave us, but also showed us what a lot of fun it could be and how it would develop some really complex, ‘deep’ musical skills, skills which are transferable and are, in general, the ones that people are talking about when they refer to the ability of music to make the brain work better (Anita Collins ‘How playing an instrument benefits your brain’ and TED Talk is worth a watch - if you haven’t heard about this click here.)

The importance of these skills was also stressed in our INSET training on Monday: musical pattern games help to calm anxious brains and can be used to literally mend traumatised brains, making them ready to cope with learning.

So, today being Wednesday at the start of term, I’ve been starting off a cycle of these games with P1, P2 and F5 and it is lovely to see the children’s engagement and enjoyment, but also a measurable improvement in their coordination, focus, cooperation and particularly their sense of rhythm and musical pulse, something that can be really tricky even for our most able musicians.

P1, right at the start of the journey, were exploring the strong beat in 2/4 and 3/4 time. The game ‘Apple Tree’ was a real hit, and, whilst enjoying the game of seeing who would be left standing when everyone else was knocked out, they happily clapped away in 2/4 until it was second nature. Moving on to 3/4 with ‘Bells in the Steeple’ is a big challenge: we only have two hands, and a pattern of ‘clap - one hand tap - other hand tap’ is tricky at first, but we quickly moved on to working in a circle to pass claves around (tap – pass one – pass the other); ok, we weren’t all successful, but it was a lot of fun and we’ll be a lot better next week!

P2 had some games they remembered from last year. ‘Epoi-tai-tai-ay’ is a favourite. It’s a ‘nonsense’ song with different clapping patterns to do with a partner to match the different words. Working with a partner (and then swapping round) is a major part of many of these games, and creates that really great atmosphere of cooperation in the face of challenge that helps us to tackle things that would be tricky and stressful by ourselves. They also worked on ‘Bells in the Steeple’ and were able to manage up to 4 sets of claves going round the circle and singing at the same time with only the odd fumble or dropped clave. I know Mrs Spencer was impressed to see her class in action at the end of the time.

rightColBody

F5 are working on composition in the music lessons this term, but have singing games on alternate Wednesday afternoons. Here we were able to move on to some much more tricky manoeuvres, for example moving round your partner every time you got to ‘ay’ in ‘Epoi-tai-tai-ay’ (and I don’t know why it is such a pleasure when you meet your original partner back round the circle, but it is, however old you are!) and when we started on a really complicated clapping game in Italian called ‘Bella Bimba’ the children were so focused on whose right hand was clapping whose left hand on which beat that they took the unfamiliar language entirely in their stride. 

The multi-cultural nature of these songs is one of the delights. Next week we’ll start to learn ‘Cape Cod Girls’, a traditional sea shanty that Linda Geoghehan has combined with a version of traditional Maori stick passing, and I know I will need to do some practice before leading the class in that one! We also started on a ‘rhythm track’ where coloured dots are laid out, in this case in groups of 4 to represent 4/4 time, and the children walk through the path in time with a steady pulse completing different tasks as they do so. Today we clapped on the first beat, jumped onto the first beat and clapped rhythms within the 4/4 pattern. This is another thing that looks simple but isn’t and one of the great musical skills it practices is getting back in with the ensemble unobtrusively if you make a mistake, something that the children quickly take in their stride when it is presented as a game like this.

The singing games are highly enjoyable at all ages, but this term I’m trying out a different-but-similar option with F8s with a drop-in African Drumming club on Wednesday break times. Research shows that drumming has lots of positive effects including relieving anxiety and stress, boosting the immune system and releasing negative feelings as well as creating a sense of connectedness with ourselves and others … ideal as the children reach an age where things, including school work, relationships and self-image, all become a bit more complicated. I bought into this when I was undertaking my teacher training.

It was the one hobby I committed myself to, travelling into central Manchester to play with Drumroots for 3 hours every Tuesday and I still find it hard to explain why it was so fulfilling and relaxing to sit in a circle with others playing the same rhythm over and over again (and yes, I was truly awful at it to start with!). As specialist in Musical Analysis, my mind wants to tell me that so much repetition should be boring, but it just isn’t, and because it is quite tricky it engages all your attention so that you really have to connect with the moment. And you never know, when the weather gets warmer we may be able to get a bit of an African atmosphere in our sessions by playing outside under a tree!

signoff
og_titleSinging Games as part of the Music Curriculum
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID510
postID510
blogID1
postTitleSinging Games as part of the Music Curriculum
postSlug2019-01-17-singing-games-as-part-of-the-music-curriculum
postDateTime2019-01-17 07:02:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Music is fun and very much alive at{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-01-17 07:02:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextMusic is fun and very much alive at Cargilfield
perch_image/cms/resources/20190110142751.jpg
perch_imageAltMusic
perch_leftColBody

Singing Games as part of the Music Curriculum

Over the last year, one of the things that I have been introducing to children of all ages at Cargilfield are singing games from a series of books published by Linda Geoghegan, who I was fortunate to have a training session with last January.

As you can imagine, practical musical training sessions can be a little nerve-wracking at times for teachers as we don’t want to look stupid! Picture the scene: the Heads of Music from pretty much all the independent schools in Edinburgh, some of us left handed, some right handed and many of us with an inferiority complex where coordination is concerned, standing in small circles with chopsticks trying to sing and pass them around in a complicated pattern that fits with the words – mayhem, lots of dropped sticks and lots of laughter! Linda really challenged us all with the tasks she gave us, but also showed us what a lot of fun it could be and how it would develop some really complex, ‘deep’ musical skills, skills which are transferable and are, in general, the ones that people are talking about when they refer to the ability of music to make the brain work better (Anita Collins ‘How playing an instrument benefits your brain’ and TED Talk is worth a watch - if you haven’t heard about this click here.)

The importance of these skills was also stressed in our INSET training on Monday: musical pattern games help to calm anxious brains and can be used to literally mend traumatised brains, making them ready to cope with learning.

So, today being Wednesday at the start of term, I’ve been starting off a cycle of these games with P1, P2 and F5 and it is lovely to see the children’s engagement and enjoyment, but also a measurable improvement in their coordination, focus, cooperation and particularly their sense of rhythm and musical pulse, something that can be really tricky even for our most able musicians.

P1, right at the start of the journey, were exploring the strong beat in 2/4 and 3/4 time. The game ‘Apple Tree’ was a real hit, and, whilst enjoying the game of seeing who would be left standing when everyone else was knocked out, they happily clapped away in 2/4 until it was second nature. Moving on to 3/4 with ‘Bells in the Steeple’ is a big challenge: we only have two hands, and a pattern of ‘clap - one hand tap - other hand tap’ is tricky at first, but we quickly moved on to working in a circle to pass claves around (tap – pass one – pass the other); ok, we weren’t all successful, but it was a lot of fun and we’ll be a lot better next week!

P2 had some games they remembered from last year. ‘Epoi-tai-tai-ay’ is a favourite. It’s a ‘nonsense’ song with different clapping patterns to do with a partner to match the different words. Working with a partner (and then swapping round) is a major part of many of these games, and creates that really great atmosphere of cooperation in the face of challenge that helps us to tackle things that would be tricky and stressful by ourselves. They also worked on ‘Bells in the Steeple’ and were able to manage up to 4 sets of claves going round the circle and singing at the same time with only the odd fumble or dropped clave. I know Mrs Spencer was impressed to see her class in action at the end of the time.

perch_rightColBody

F5 are working on composition in the music lessons this term, but have singing games on alternate Wednesday afternoons. Here we were able to move on to some much more tricky manoeuvres, for example moving round your partner every time you got to ‘ay’ in ‘Epoi-tai-tai-ay’ (and I don’t know why it is such a pleasure when you meet your original partner back round the circle, but it is, however old you are!) and when we started on a really complicated clapping game in Italian called ‘Bella Bimba’ the children were so focused on whose right hand was clapping whose left hand on which beat that they took the unfamiliar language entirely in their stride. 

The multi-cultural nature of these songs is one of the delights. Next week we’ll start to learn ‘Cape Cod Girls’, a traditional sea shanty that Linda Geoghehan has combined with a version of traditional Maori stick passing, and I know I will need to do some practice before leading the class in that one! We also started on a ‘rhythm track’ where coloured dots are laid out, in this case in groups of 4 to represent 4/4 time, and the children walk through the path in time with a steady pulse completing different tasks as they do so. Today we clapped on the first beat, jumped onto the first beat and clapped rhythms within the 4/4 pattern. This is another thing that looks simple but isn’t and one of the great musical skills it practices is getting back in with the ensemble unobtrusively if you make a mistake, something that the children quickly take in their stride when it is presented as a game like this.

The singing games are highly enjoyable at all ages, but this term I’m trying out a different-but-similar option with F8s with a drop-in African Drumming club on Wednesday break times. Research shows that drumming has lots of positive effects including relieving anxiety and stress, boosting the immune system and releasing negative feelings as well as creating a sense of connectedness with ourselves and others … ideal as the children reach an age where things, including school work, relationships and self-image, all become a bit more complicated. I bought into this when I was undertaking my teacher training.

It was the one hobby I committed myself to, travelling into central Manchester to play with Drumroots for 3 hours every Tuesday and I still find it hard to explain why it was so fulfilling and relaxing to sit in a circle with others playing the same rhythm over and over again (and yes, I was truly awful at it to start with!). As specialist in Musical Analysis, my mind wants to tell me that so much repetition should be boring, but it just isn’t, and because it is quite tricky it engages all your attention so that you really have to connect with the moment. And you never know, when the weather gets warmer we may be able to get a bit of an African atmosphere in our sessions by playing outside under a tree!

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleSinging Games as part of the Music Curriculum
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-01-17-singing-games-as-part-of-the-music-curriculum
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-01-17-singing-games-as-part-of-the-music-curriculum
perch_item_firsttrue
perch_item_zero_index0
perch_item_index1
perch_item_rev_index10
perch_item_rev_zero_index9
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set1
perch_zero_index_in_set0
perch_first_in_settrue
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Music

Singing Games as part of the Music Curriculum

Music is fun and very much alive at Cargilfield

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextUsing technology to inspire a love of the Classics
image/cms/resources/untitled-1.png
imageAltLatin
leftColBody

The Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated and rather rigorous at that, as any pupil or parent of a child studying CE will know. In terms of the Latin language itself, it will provide them with a GCSE-level understanding of grammar and translation. Unfortunately, this does not leave much room for Classical mythology, history or culture. These the areas that grasp a pupil’s imagination and wonder and really should be accommodated into the CE syllabus more than it is; a mere passing thought. No one studies Latin and Greek solely because of their love of the Latin language but to allow them to access Classical texts to engage in the culture, history and mythology of two of the greatest civilisations the world has ever seen and have given the modern world so much.  

I have thought long and hard about how to incorporate these cultural aspects into my teaching without watering down their understanding and my teaching of the language and their ability to tackle the demanding CE and Scholarship examinations. One idea that I thought would be useful and not time consuming in class was Digital Maps of the Ancient World.

This idea was born from the stories of history and mythology that occur in the pupil’s Latin and Greek translations. The stories are generally discussed once they have been translated in class to give the pupils the context of what was translated. However, the pupils found it difficult to visualise where the stories actually happened; was it in Italy? Off the coast of Greece? Or in the depths of Persia?

I used the Google My Maps software to plot the Greek Myths, such as The Odyssey, the Labours of Hercules and the Iliad. This allowed the pupils to gain a better understanding of the myths and where they took place.

Untitled

rightColBody

I have also ventured onto mapping the Roman Empire, again so that pupils can understand the geographical locations of famous Roman stories and historical figures.

Untitled

Untitled

This is now all accessible on a website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

Untitled

signoff
og_titleDigitally Mapping the Ancient World
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID499
postID499
blogID1
postTitleDigitally Mapping the Ancient World
postSlug2019-01-10-digitally-mapping-the-ancient-world
postDateTime2019-01-10 06:05:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Using technology to inspire a love of the{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2019-01-10 06:05:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextUsing technology to inspire a love of the Classics
perch_image/cms/resources/untitled-1.png
perch_imageAltLatin
perch_leftColBody

The Common Entrance and Scholarship syllabi are grammar orientated and rather rigorous at that, as any pupil or parent of a child studying CE will know. In terms of the Latin language itself, it will provide them with a GCSE-level understanding of grammar and translation. Unfortunately, this does not leave much room for Classical mythology, history or culture. These the areas that grasp a pupil’s imagination and wonder and really should be accommodated into the CE syllabus more than it is; a mere passing thought. No one studies Latin and Greek solely because of their love of the Latin language but to allow them to access Classical texts to engage in the culture, history and mythology of two of the greatest civilisations the world has ever seen and have given the modern world so much.  

I have thought long and hard about how to incorporate these cultural aspects into my teaching without watering down their understanding and my teaching of the language and their ability to tackle the demanding CE and Scholarship examinations. One idea that I thought would be useful and not time consuming in class was Digital Maps of the Ancient World.

This idea was born from the stories of history and mythology that occur in the pupil’s Latin and Greek translations. The stories are generally discussed once they have been translated in class to give the pupils the context of what was translated. However, the pupils found it difficult to visualise where the stories actually happened; was it in Italy? Off the coast of Greece? Or in the depths of Persia?

I used the Google My Maps software to plot the Greek Myths, such as The Odyssey, the Labours of Hercules and the Iliad. This allowed the pupils to gain a better understanding of the myths and where they took place.

Untitled

perch_rightColBody

I have also ventured onto mapping the Roman Empire, again so that pupils can understand the geographical locations of famous Roman stories and historical figures.

Untitled

Untitled

This is now all accessible on a website: www.digitalmapsoftheancientworld.com so that pupils can explore in their own time.

Untitled

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleDigitally Mapping the Ancient World
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2019-01-10-digitally-mapping-the-ancient-world
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2019-01-10-digitally-mapping-the-ancient-world
perch_item_zero_index1
perch_item_index2
perch_item_rev_index9
perch_item_rev_zero_index8
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set2
perch_zero_index_in_set1
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Latin

Digitally Mapping the Ancient World

Using technology to inspire a love of the Classics

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextGetting out of the classroom and in to the real world!
image/cms/resources/7641114e-cb44-48bd-9d28-11b37be796e6.jpg
imageAltGeography
leftColBody

T+L blog AP (1)

rightColBody

T+L blog (2)

signoff
og_titleThe value of fieldwork in Geography!
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID462
postID462
blogID1
postTitleThe value of fieldwork in Geography!
postSlug2018-12-02-the-value-of-fieldwork-in-geography
postDateTime2018-12-02 11:30:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Getting out of the classroom and in to the real{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-12-02 11:30:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextGetting out of the classroom and in to the real world!
perch_image/cms/resources/7641114e-cb44-48bd-9d28-11b37be796e6.jpg
perch_imageAltGeography
perch_leftColBody

T+L blog AP (1)

perch_rightColBody

T+L blog (2)

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleThe value of fieldwork in Geography!
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-12-02-the-value-of-fieldwork-in-geography
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-12-02-the-value-of-fieldwork-in-geography
perch_item_zero_index2
perch_item_index3
perch_item_rev_index8
perch_item_rev_zero_index7
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set3
perch_zero_index_in_set2
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Geography

The value of fieldwork in Geography!

Getting out of the classroom and in to the real world!

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextNew facilities for all to benefit from
image/cms/resources/img0746.jpg
imageAltSport
leftColBody

Sport at Cargilfield has always played a huge role in the daily life of both children and staff and the development of resources over the years has improved dramatically. This reflects the growing changes in a range of sports, and the ever-evolving technology of playing surfaces such as Astro turf. As a school, we found that our “old” surface was outdated and needing replaced. With the children needing use of an Astro for all three terms in a range of sports, we recognised the need for a larger playing surface which would enable all children to use it, rather than just the elite fortunate few. Santa must have been listening and this term, we finally got our wish and our smart new Astro and totally refurbished “old” one are now both up and running. Already the difference in the quality of coaching is evident, and it has been great to see all children, regardless of ability or age, have access to the surface during lessons, at break, at Games and in the evenings. The viewing areas are also much improved and we hope to have many many years of teaching and learning, and mostly importantly, fun, on our super new astro. Thank you Santa!

SM

rightColBody
signoff
og_titleSport for all at Cargilfield!
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID458
postID458
blogID1
postTitleSport for all at Cargilfield!
postSlug2018-11-26-sport-for-all-at-cargilfield
postDateTime2018-11-26 15:54:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"New facilities for all to benefit from","image":{"assetID":"2394","title":"IMG{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-11-26 15:54:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextNew facilities for all to benefit from
perch_image/cms/resources/img0746.jpg
perch_imageAltSport
perch_leftColBody

Sport at Cargilfield has always played a huge role in the daily life of both children and staff and the development of resources over the years has improved dramatically. This reflects the growing changes in a range of sports, and the ever-evolving technology of playing surfaces such as Astro turf. As a school, we found that our “old” surface was outdated and needing replaced. With the children needing use of an Astro for all three terms in a range of sports, we recognised the need for a larger playing surface which would enable all children to use it, rather than just the elite fortunate few. Santa must have been listening and this term, we finally got our wish and our smart new Astro and totally refurbished “old” one are now both up and running. Already the difference in the quality of coaching is evident, and it has been great to see all children, regardless of ability or age, have access to the surface during lessons, at break, at Games and in the evenings. The viewing areas are also much improved and we hope to have many many years of teaching and learning, and mostly importantly, fun, on our super new astro. Thank you Santa!

SM

perch_rightColBody
perch_signoff
perch_og_titleSport for all at Cargilfield!
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-11-26-sport-for-all-at-cargilfield
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-11-26-sport-for-all-at-cargilfield
perch_item_zero_index3
perch_item_index4
perch_item_rev_index7
perch_item_rev_zero_index6
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set4
perch_zero_index_in_set3
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Sport

Sport for all at Cargilfield!

New facilities for all to benefit from

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextIt is not as hard as you think!
image/cms/resources/john-napier-scottish-mathematician-science-source.jpg
imageAltMaths
leftColBody

Multiplication

Multiplication 2

rightColBody

Multiplication 3

RF

12.11.18

signoff
og_titleLong Multiplication!
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID408
postID408
blogID1
postTitleLong Multiplication!
postSlug2018-11-12-long-multiplication
postDateTime2018-11-12 15:53:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"It is not as hard as you think!","image":{"assetID":"2327","title":"John napier{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-11-12 15:53:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextIt is not as hard as you think!
perch_image/cms/resources/john-napier-scottish-mathematician-science-source.jpg
perch_imageAltMaths
perch_leftColBody

Multiplication

Multiplication 2

perch_rightColBody

Multiplication 3

RF

12.11.18

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleLong Multiplication!
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-11-12-long-multiplication
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-11-12-long-multiplication
perch_item_zero_index4
perch_item_index5
perch_item_rev_index6
perch_item_rev_zero_index5
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set5
perch_zero_index_in_set4
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Maths

Long Multiplication!

It is not as hard as you think!

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextParents can play a crucial role
image/cms/resources/conditionypexam.jpg
imageAltTeaching Blog
leftColBody

With the impending exams roving on the horizon, my mind often wanders to how we support the ‘examinees’ to battle the coming tide of expectation. Pressure mounts and revision is diligently completed, or expertly avoided. The exams themselves occur with a surprising lack of fanfare and the children prove them equal to the task.

Of course, exams don’t ‘rove’ and they shouldn’t be a ‘battle’. However, they can sometimes cause a little worry in the children and, experience suggests, a little worry in their parents too.

Sometimes a little worry evolves. It grows. It becomes a mountain that seems insurmountable and when this happens a little worry becomes anxiety. Anxiety is a pest; it doesn’t limit itself to one area of our lives. It can grow from anywhere; I mentioned exams, but it can evolve out of difficult social situations, particular subjects that just won’t allow themselves to be learned, the thought of performing in the chapel or on the stage.

Anxiety doesn’t discriminate and so as teachers and parents we must learn to recognise the signs and be prepared to support our children. Anxiety is beyond a worry. It’s not an ‘overreaction’, it attacks the confidence and self-esteem that we all work so hard to build in our children and it is not insurmountable. It can be beaten.

Anxiety becomes a problem for children when it gets in the way of their day-to-day life. The NHS website usefully lists many of the signs of anxiety in younger and older children here but what to do?

Listen. Listen to them and give them opportunities to talk, if they want to. Hiding a conversation behind a joint activity can make it feel less like the Spanish inquisition.

Show. Show that you understand how they are feeling by summarising what they have said and checking with them that you understood correctly

rightColBody

Talk. Talk to us. We can’t help if we don’t know and children can sometimes behave very differently at home to the way they behave at school. There are many avenues to contact us; your child’s Form teacher is a very good place to start, but all staff have had pastoral training and are able to help.

I have been lucky in my years of teaching to work with a number of experienced Educational Psychologists. From this body of professionals I have garnered a few sage pieces of advice and the one that springs to mind on this subject is that ‘all behaviour has a function’. Anxiety has a function too, it is telling us to ask for help.

Fake it. If your child is anxious you will be too. In fact, if you’re like me, the very thought that they might encounter even mild discomfort will have your guts in knots, but you can’t help them with more anxiety. You need to seem like the oasis of calm containment they need for their emotions. A tall order, but another piece of advice springs to mind for this; ‘fake it till you make it’.

There are some great resources available on line if you would like to learn more about anxiety. I list them here with some further reading suggestions.

A total lack of interest in exams is a problem, it denotes a child who might not be taking their learning seriously. A preoccupation with exams is also problem, as it can cause children to forget the essential purpose of examinations; showing the child what they know, what they don’t know and giving them an understanding of what it feels like to be assessed in this way.

Our children are unlikely ever to be asked the results of their Form 6 Autumn exams in a job interview. In this way they are wholly unimportant, but as a learning experience the exams teach the children vital skills they will need as they progress through their senior schools. The sooner these skills are learned, the more time each child has to hone them to perfection.

NL

4.11.18

signoff
og_titleAnxiety before exams and how to help
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID404
postID404
blogID1
postTitleAnxiety before exams and how to help
postSlug2018-11-04-anxiety-before-exams-and-how-to-help
postDateTime2018-11-04 20:55:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Parents can play a crucial role","image":{"assetID":"2293","title":"Condition yp{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-11-04 20:55:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextParents can play a crucial role
perch_image/cms/resources/conditionypexam.jpg
perch_imageAltTeaching Blog
perch_leftColBody

With the impending exams roving on the horizon, my mind often wanders to how we support the ‘examinees’ to battle the coming tide of expectation. Pressure mounts and revision is diligently completed, or expertly avoided. The exams themselves occur with a surprising lack of fanfare and the children prove them equal to the task.

Of course, exams don’t ‘rove’ and they shouldn’t be a ‘battle’. However, they can sometimes cause a little worry in the children and, experience suggests, a little worry in their parents too.

Sometimes a little worry evolves. It grows. It becomes a mountain that seems insurmountable and when this happens a little worry becomes anxiety. Anxiety is a pest; it doesn’t limit itself to one area of our lives. It can grow from anywhere; I mentioned exams, but it can evolve out of difficult social situations, particular subjects that just won’t allow themselves to be learned, the thought of performing in the chapel or on the stage.

Anxiety doesn’t discriminate and so as teachers and parents we must learn to recognise the signs and be prepared to support our children. Anxiety is beyond a worry. It’s not an ‘overreaction’, it attacks the confidence and self-esteem that we all work so hard to build in our children and it is not insurmountable. It can be beaten.

Anxiety becomes a problem for children when it gets in the way of their day-to-day life. The NHS website usefully lists many of the signs of anxiety in younger and older children here but what to do?

Listen. Listen to them and give them opportunities to talk, if they want to. Hiding a conversation behind a joint activity can make it feel less like the Spanish inquisition.

Show. Show that you understand how they are feeling by summarising what they have said and checking with them that you understood correctly

perch_rightColBody

Talk. Talk to us. We can’t help if we don’t know and children can sometimes behave very differently at home to the way they behave at school. There are many avenues to contact us; your child’s Form teacher is a very good place to start, but all staff have had pastoral training and are able to help.

I have been lucky in my years of teaching to work with a number of experienced Educational Psychologists. From this body of professionals I have garnered a few sage pieces of advice and the one that springs to mind on this subject is that ‘all behaviour has a function’. Anxiety has a function too, it is telling us to ask for help.

Fake it. If your child is anxious you will be too. In fact, if you’re like me, the very thought that they might encounter even mild discomfort will have your guts in knots, but you can’t help them with more anxiety. You need to seem like the oasis of calm containment they need for their emotions. A tall order, but another piece of advice springs to mind for this; ‘fake it till you make it’.

There are some great resources available on line if you would like to learn more about anxiety. I list them here with some further reading suggestions.

A total lack of interest in exams is a problem, it denotes a child who might not be taking their learning seriously. A preoccupation with exams is also problem, as it can cause children to forget the essential purpose of examinations; showing the child what they know, what they don’t know and giving them an understanding of what it feels like to be assessed in this way.

Our children are unlikely ever to be asked the results of their Form 6 Autumn exams in a job interview. In this way they are wholly unimportant, but as a learning experience the exams teach the children vital skills they will need as they progress through their senior schools. The sooner these skills are learned, the more time each child has to hone them to perfection.

NL

4.11.18

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleAnxiety before exams and how to help
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-11-04-anxiety-before-exams-and-how-to-help
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-11-04-anxiety-before-exams-and-how-to-help
perch_item_zero_index5
perch_item_index6
perch_item_rev_index5
perch_item_rev_zero_index4
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set6
perch_zero_index_in_set5
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Teaching Blog

Anxiety before exams and how to help

Parents can play a crucial role

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextForm 7 had a great trip to Normandy.
image/cms/resources/32082b80-35d7-47bc-b5ad-7b9597470423.jpg
imageAlt
leftColBody

You might have heard of a little trip year 7 did last month? The French trip to Normandie obviously!! What else could I write about when it is still so present in my lessons? The trip was a great success as much for the children as for the teachers. We stayed in a refurbished farm called La Grand’Ferme in the countryside, we visited gorgeous places such as the Mont St Michel, ate delicious foods, petted animals and... Wait...don’t think this was an excuse for a weekend escapade!

Au contraire!!

The main aim of this trip was not just the visits but more the immersion type of education the children were getting out of it. During the trip, the children were spoken to only in French and were encouraged to speak French in return through miming and repetitions. For instance they were told every morning in French, what food they had on their table, how to ask for more to the chef and how to clear their tables after breakfast, meaning repetition of words such as cutlery, foods etc.

But the benefits were not just visible during the trip:

Before going to France:

Motivation was a key word before, during and after the trip. I have seen pupils trying harder in class as we spent the first three weeks preparing for the trip. We revised some basics like weather, foods or how to ask for foods. They also created role plays in class to practice their speaking before arriving there (we had some very ‘interesting’ weather forecasts and shopping enquiries!). You could feel the excitation growing as the trip got nearer.

rightColBody

While in France:

It was amazing to see the effort some pupils who are usually shy would actually put into understanding and using the language on site. As teachers we felt like meeting new pupils sometimes! Several times we, teachers, were surprised to hear children speaking French to each other just for fun during their free-time (while playing cards in the coach for instance). During a trip like this children get a chance to learn about the culture as much as the language and it gives them a chance to try new things and discover a new motivation for a subject, here French.

After:

Since we have been back, we have been using more target language in the classroom than before. I can tell how much the trip has boosted some children. All the pupils have been writing mini-posters about the activities they have done and what they really liked or not. I was delightfully surprised to see them all trying hard. Especially, pupils who are usually reluctant in writing anything needed to be slowed down a little as they wanted to describe every single aspect of their trip (the display boards would not have been big enough). The mini-posters are now displayed around the school along with some pictures if you want to have a look for yourself.

So, in brief, a trip abroad is not just about the fun and the visits but about the motivation as much as the insight into a culture and a way of life the children get out of it. It is about the will to communicate with others even if you make mistakes as long as the message gets through. It is about getting out of your comfort zone and push yourself to try harder. This trip is also about pride and ownership: it was the 2018 year 7 trip to Normandie and it belongs to them now and they can be proud of what they have gained from it. They made it a success and I am sure the year 6 have heard some of their stories and now are wondering what I am cooking up for them next year...to be continued.

signoff
og_titleThe benefits of immersion in French
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID339
postID339
blogID1
postTitleThe benefits of immersion in French
postSlug2018-10-08-the-benefits-of-immersion-in-french
postDateTime2018-10-08 11:30:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Form 7 had a great trip to Normandy.","image":{"assetID":"2087","title":"32082b80{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-10-08 11:30:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextForm 7 had a great trip to Normandy.
perch_image/cms/resources/32082b80-35d7-47bc-b5ad-7b9597470423.jpg
perch_imageAlt
perch_leftColBody

You might have heard of a little trip year 7 did last month? The French trip to Normandie obviously!! What else could I write about when it is still so present in my lessons? The trip was a great success as much for the children as for the teachers. We stayed in a refurbished farm called La Grand’Ferme in the countryside, we visited gorgeous places such as the Mont St Michel, ate delicious foods, petted animals and... Wait...don’t think this was an excuse for a weekend escapade!

Au contraire!!

The main aim of this trip was not just the visits but more the immersion type of education the children were getting out of it. During the trip, the children were spoken to only in French and were encouraged to speak French in return through miming and repetitions. For instance they were told every morning in French, what food they had on their table, how to ask for more to the chef and how to clear their tables after breakfast, meaning repetition of words such as cutlery, foods etc.

But the benefits were not just visible during the trip:

Before going to France:

Motivation was a key word before, during and after the trip. I have seen pupils trying harder in class as we spent the first three weeks preparing for the trip. We revised some basics like weather, foods or how to ask for foods. They also created role plays in class to practice their speaking before arriving there (we had some very ‘interesting’ weather forecasts and shopping enquiries!). You could feel the excitation growing as the trip got nearer.

perch_rightColBody

While in France:

It was amazing to see the effort some pupils who are usually shy would actually put into understanding and using the language on site. As teachers we felt like meeting new pupils sometimes! Several times we, teachers, were surprised to hear children speaking French to each other just for fun during their free-time (while playing cards in the coach for instance). During a trip like this children get a chance to learn about the culture as much as the language and it gives them a chance to try new things and discover a new motivation for a subject, here French.

After:

Since we have been back, we have been using more target language in the classroom than before. I can tell how much the trip has boosted some children. All the pupils have been writing mini-posters about the activities they have done and what they really liked or not. I was delightfully surprised to see them all trying hard. Especially, pupils who are usually reluctant in writing anything needed to be slowed down a little as they wanted to describe every single aspect of their trip (the display boards would not have been big enough). The mini-posters are now displayed around the school along with some pictures if you want to have a look for yourself.

So, in brief, a trip abroad is not just about the fun and the visits but about the motivation as much as the insight into a culture and a way of life the children get out of it. It is about the will to communicate with others even if you make mistakes as long as the message gets through. It is about getting out of your comfort zone and push yourself to try harder. This trip is also about pride and ownership: it was the 2018 year 7 trip to Normandie and it belongs to them now and they can be proud of what they have gained from it. They made it a success and I am sure the year 6 have heard some of their stories and now are wondering what I am cooking up for them next year...to be continued.

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleThe benefits of immersion in French
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-10-08-the-benefits-of-immersion-in-french
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-10-08-the-benefits-of-immersion-in-french
perch_item_zero_index6
perch_item_index7
perch_item_rev_index4
perch_item_rev_zero_index3
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set7
perch_zero_index_in_set6
perch_namespaceperch:blog

The benefits of immersion in French

Form 7 had a great trip to Normandy.

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextA mathematical challenge!
image/cms/resources/unknown-1.jpeg
imageAlt
leftColBody

It is in the Autumn Term of Form 7 that the children first encounter Pi (π) in their Maths lessons. 3.1415926…


Many have already heard of Pi, some even have an idea of how this remarkable irrational value might be used. Some already know that it is irrational and cannot be exactly represented as a simple fraction. No sequence is recurring and it is therefore assumed that any series of numbers could be found within it. As computing power grows, so does our ability to extend the known digits of Pi – the current record is over 22 trillion digits.


They may also know that an approximation of Pi was used by many ancient civilisations, including the Egyptians, Babylonians and Greeks. Their knowledge may even extend to mathematical calculations relating to features in nature.


Form 7 use is limited to two circle applications: calculating circumference and area, where Circumference = 2πr and Area = πr^2. The children use these formulas to calculate the perimeter and area of a variety of circle-related shapes, including semi-circles, quarter circles and annuli. Many children, however, have a curiosity about Pi which extends beyond its limited use in class and sooner or later they will ask, “”How did they (all those historical mathematicians) work out Pi?” So, for all of those minds curious about Pi, and knowing that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, here are some methods which may be used to find an approximation of Pi.


One method is to measure the circumference (perimeter) of a circle and then divide that by the diameter (the straight line passing from one side of a circle to the other through the centre). Cylinders are quite a good starting place, as they allow for easy measuring of the circumference.

rightColBody

For more accuracy, mathematical methods will be required, such as the method employed by Indian mathematician, Nilakantha Somayaji (1444-1544)


IMG 9535


The further this calculation is extended, the more accurate the approximation of Pi will be.


And perhaps the most fascinating way is based on Buffon’s needle; a probability approximation which combines the random tossing of toothpicks with a formula.


First divide up a sheet of paper into parallel lines which are the same distance apart as each toothpick is long, i.e. If the toothpicks are 8 cm long, make sure the parallel lines are 8 cm apart. Then randomly throw toothpicks onto the paper: more toothpicks = better results. After tossing, discard any toothpicks which are not completely on the paper then count up all of the remaining toothpicks, and also count up how many sticks are crossing one of the parallel lines.


Finally use this formula to approximate Pi:
Pi = 2 × (total number of toothpicks) ÷ (number of line-crossing toothpicks).


Ultimately, the children will use the π button on their calculators, which stores an approximation to about 10 digits and provides more than ample accuracy for their maths problems. Learning multiple digits of Pi is not essential although if anyone is particularly keen, the current recital record stands at 70 030 digits. If that’s a bit much then count up the letters in each word that makes up the title of this post.


RL

signoff
og_titleHow I wish I could calculate Pi!
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID336
postID336
blogID1
postTitleHow I wish I could calculate Pi!
postSlug2018-10-02-how-i-wish-i-could-calculate-pi
postDateTime2018-10-02 08:35:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"A mathematical{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-10-02 08:35:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextA mathematical challenge!
perch_image/cms/resources/unknown-1.jpeg
perch_imageAlt
perch_leftColBody

It is in the Autumn Term of Form 7 that the children first encounter Pi (π) in their Maths lessons. 3.1415926…


Many have already heard of Pi, some even have an idea of how this remarkable irrational value might be used. Some already know that it is irrational and cannot be exactly represented as a simple fraction. No sequence is recurring and it is therefore assumed that any series of numbers could be found within it. As computing power grows, so does our ability to extend the known digits of Pi – the current record is over 22 trillion digits.


They may also know that an approximation of Pi was used by many ancient civilisations, including the Egyptians, Babylonians and Greeks. Their knowledge may even extend to mathematical calculations relating to features in nature.


Form 7 use is limited to two circle applications: calculating circumference and area, where Circumference = 2πr and Area = πr^2. The children use these formulas to calculate the perimeter and area of a variety of circle-related shapes, including semi-circles, quarter circles and annuli. Many children, however, have a curiosity about Pi which extends beyond its limited use in class and sooner or later they will ask, “”How did they (all those historical mathematicians) work out Pi?” So, for all of those minds curious about Pi, and knowing that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, here are some methods which may be used to find an approximation of Pi.


One method is to measure the circumference (perimeter) of a circle and then divide that by the diameter (the straight line passing from one side of a circle to the other through the centre). Cylinders are quite a good starting place, as they allow for easy measuring of the circumference.

perch_rightColBody

For more accuracy, mathematical methods will be required, such as the method employed by Indian mathematician, Nilakantha Somayaji (1444-1544)


IMG 9535


The further this calculation is extended, the more accurate the approximation of Pi will be.


And perhaps the most fascinating way is based on Buffon’s needle; a probability approximation which combines the random tossing of toothpicks with a formula.


First divide up a sheet of paper into parallel lines which are the same distance apart as each toothpick is long, i.e. If the toothpicks are 8 cm long, make sure the parallel lines are 8 cm apart. Then randomly throw toothpicks onto the paper: more toothpicks = better results. After tossing, discard any toothpicks which are not completely on the paper then count up all of the remaining toothpicks, and also count up how many sticks are crossing one of the parallel lines.


Finally use this formula to approximate Pi:
Pi = 2 × (total number of toothpicks) ÷ (number of line-crossing toothpicks).


Ultimately, the children will use the π button on their calculators, which stores an approximation to about 10 digits and provides more than ample accuracy for their maths problems. Learning multiple digits of Pi is not essential although if anyone is particularly keen, the current recital record stands at 70 030 digits. If that’s a bit much then count up the letters in each word that makes up the title of this post.


RL

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleHow I wish I could calculate Pi!
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-10-02-how-i-wish-i-could-calculate-pi
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-10-02-how-i-wish-i-could-calculate-pi
perch_item_zero_index7
perch_item_index8
perch_item_rev_index3
perch_item_rev_zero_index2
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set8
perch_zero_index_in_set7
perch_namespaceperch:blog

How I wish I could calculate Pi!

A mathematical challenge!

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextA few thoughts on the teaching of Maths
image/cms/resources/58820029-a375-42d9-98b1-3d14db7b4e3c.jpg
imageAltMaths
leftColBody

Your memories of Maths at school may well include standing in front of the class reciting times tables. Mine certainly do. When teaching Maths, that is the last thing I want to do. At Cargilfield, our aim is to develop and embed a fluency, creating a deeper knowledge and understanding of underlying mathematical concepts.

Maths is not simply about the classroom or times tables – it is immersed in our daily lives. And whatever your thoughts on the subject, everyone has the ability to harness it in one way or another. There is a common misconception that you are either “good” or “bad” at Maths, but Mathematics is entirely logical: there is no mysterious magic or trickery involved. I so often hear “well I was no good at Maths at school”. Funnily enough, I wasn’t confident in Maths until the age of 12, when it all clicked into place. I went on to study Maths in my later years at school and now I have a strong passion for teaching the subject!

Even though most of us rely on technology these days to do a calculation, you still need to be able to choose the correct operation (multiply, divide, add or subtract) to tackle the problem at hand, and mental arithmetic is still a constant in daily life. For example, working out a 20% discount. Your brain follows a process: 20% is the same as one-fifth, so you divide by 5, then subtract your answer from the original price. Others might divide by 10 then multiply by 2 to work out the saving. Without being conscious of it, you are using Maths. In fact, your first thought of the day may well be a mathematical one when you open your eyes and look at your alarm clock.

rightColBody

What might be second nature to you is an entirely new way of thinking for your child. However, with the right mindset, access to different ways of learning and the opportunity to make mistakes, anything is possible. My favourite quote is by Albert Einstein: “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” Making mistakes is part of the learning process in Maths. This is an important lesson to teach children as they work through problems and more challenging questions. This skill can also be applied throughout life. How dull would life be if we never pushed ourselves for fear of failure?

I was very surprised to hear from the Form 7 and 8 STEM workshop that by 2022 it’s expected that the UK will be short of 2 million engineers. This type of job requires a wide set of skills, one of which is Maths. If every child realises they can use Maths in their daily lives and understand that it is not only for the classroom, then we will be helping future generations open up new opportunities when they become adults.

Which is why, when explaining new Maths concepts to the children, I like to take a leaf out of American mathematician Stan Gudder’s book: “The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated, but to make complicated things simple.”

LAW

signoff
og_titleMaths in everyday life
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID302
postID302
blogID1
postTitleMaths in everyday life
postSlug2018-09-21-maths-in-everyday-life
postDateTime2018-09-21 07:28:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"A few thoughts on the teaching of Maths","image":{"assetID":"1916","title":"58820029{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-09-21 07:28:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextA few thoughts on the teaching of Maths
perch_image/cms/resources/58820029-a375-42d9-98b1-3d14db7b4e3c.jpg
perch_imageAltMaths
perch_leftColBody

Your memories of Maths at school may well include standing in front of the class reciting times tables. Mine certainly do. When teaching Maths, that is the last thing I want to do. At Cargilfield, our aim is to develop and embed a fluency, creating a deeper knowledge and understanding of underlying mathematical concepts.

Maths is not simply about the classroom or times tables – it is immersed in our daily lives. And whatever your thoughts on the subject, everyone has the ability to harness it in one way or another. There is a common misconception that you are either “good” or “bad” at Maths, but Mathematics is entirely logical: there is no mysterious magic or trickery involved. I so often hear “well I was no good at Maths at school”. Funnily enough, I wasn’t confident in Maths until the age of 12, when it all clicked into place. I went on to study Maths in my later years at school and now I have a strong passion for teaching the subject!

Even though most of us rely on technology these days to do a calculation, you still need to be able to choose the correct operation (multiply, divide, add or subtract) to tackle the problem at hand, and mental arithmetic is still a constant in daily life. For example, working out a 20% discount. Your brain follows a process: 20% is the same as one-fifth, so you divide by 5, then subtract your answer from the original price. Others might divide by 10 then multiply by 2 to work out the saving. Without being conscious of it, you are using Maths. In fact, your first thought of the day may well be a mathematical one when you open your eyes and look at your alarm clock.

perch_rightColBody

What might be second nature to you is an entirely new way of thinking for your child. However, with the right mindset, access to different ways of learning and the opportunity to make mistakes, anything is possible. My favourite quote is by Albert Einstein: “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” Making mistakes is part of the learning process in Maths. This is an important lesson to teach children as they work through problems and more challenging questions. This skill can also be applied throughout life. How dull would life be if we never pushed ourselves for fear of failure?

I was very surprised to hear from the Form 7 and 8 STEM workshop that by 2022 it’s expected that the UK will be short of 2 million engineers. This type of job requires a wide set of skills, one of which is Maths. If every child realises they can use Maths in their daily lives and understand that it is not only for the classroom, then we will be helping future generations open up new opportunities when they become adults.

Which is why, when explaining new Maths concepts to the children, I like to take a leaf out of American mathematician Stan Gudder’s book: “The essence of mathematics is not to make simple things complicated, but to make complicated things simple.”

LAW

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleMaths in everyday life
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-09-21-maths-in-everyday-life
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-09-21-maths-in-everyday-life
perch_item_zero_index8
perch_item_index9
perch_item_rev_index2
perch_item_rev_zero_index1
perch_item_odd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set9
perch_zero_index_in_set8
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Maths

Maths in everyday life

A few thoughts on the teaching of Maths

Read More


Posted on

IDValue
perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextCreativity through play in the Nursery.
image/cms/resources/photo-12-09-2018-10-37-43.jpg
imageAltNursery
leftColBody

It always amazes me how much children learn from each other; their peers, siblings and friends. However, I think as adults we also sometimes forget just how much ‘learning’ happens through play! In the nursery we are given daily reminders of the important role that play gives the children as they grow and develop and how pivotal it is to their learning. In the nursery here at Cargilfield, the children have been learning about woodlands and woodland animals and it is incredible to see how much of the children’s learning has been; developed, extended and consolidated through their play.

We see examples of this every day in all sorts of wonderful ways, a few of which I have highlighted here:

All sorts of fantastic art work and den building have taken place over the last few weeks where the children have been able to use their imagination and problem solving skills to create something wonderful. These types of play scenarios are crucial in developing the children’s imagination, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Creativity through play has also been shown in many different contexts this term. The children have created their own self-portraits, made woodland art pictures and scavenged for items to make their own woodland crowns to give just a few examples. These sorts of activities are so important to help brain development in early childhood as they promote cognitive, social and emotional development aswell as helping to develop a range of multi-sensory skills.

rightColBody

The sand and water areas in the nursery have been very popular this term as the children make and test their hypotheses, stretch their imagination and explore their senses through these different mediums. They have been encouraged to lead their own learning to help them develop their physical, cognitive and social skills in a variety of ways. Sand and water have provided the ultimate ‘blank canvas’ to enable this to take place.

The children have already been engaging in the nursery allotment over the last few weeks; planting pumpkin seeds and thinking of ways in which we can help the seeds grow and what we can make/do with the pumpkins once they have grown. Gardening is a fantastic experience which enables the children to discover, learn and explore their natural surroundings. The children are leading the learning in this instance; deciding what we plant, how we might help the seeds to grow and what we want to do with the vegetables which will grow i.e use them to make snack each week in nursery.

Role play and creative drama has also played an important role in the children’s learning so far this term. It is through this type of play that the children are extending their understanding of community, culture and the wider world as they take on different characters in play and learn to empathise and understand the feelings of others as they ‘step’ in to their shoes. We have had some wonderful ‘role play’ so far this term with the children using masks of woodland animals as a prompt to ‘become’ the animal and then searching for food and making houses through their play.

So, when we take a step back and consider ‘How do we learn best?’ let’s not forget about the crucial role that play contributes to a child’s learning and development, something which we are reminded of in the nursery every single day.

JH

signoff
og_titleWhat we learn through play.
og_description
og_image
og_type
itemID293
postID293
blogID1
postTitleWhat we learn through play.
postSlug2018-09-18-what-we-learn-through-play
postDateTime2018-09-18 09:10:00
postDescRaw
postDescHTML
postDynamicFields{"introText":"Creativity through play in the Nursery.","image":{"assetID":"1868","title":"Photo 12{...}
postTags
postStatusPublished
authorID3
sectionID9
postCommentCount0
postImportID
postLegacyURL
postAllowComments1
postTemplatepost.html
postMetaTemplatepost_meta.html
postIsPublished0
sortval2018-09-18 09:10:00
htb_section-link/teaching-and-learning
pagingtrue
total15
number_of_pages2
total_pages2
per_page10
current_page1
lower_bound1
upper_bound10
prev_url
next_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php?page=2
prev_page_number
next_page_number2
first_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
last_page_url/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
first_pagetrue
not_last_pagetrue
perch_introTextCreativity through play in the Nursery.
perch_image/cms/resources/photo-12-09-2018-10-37-43.jpg
perch_imageAltNursery
perch_leftColBody

It always amazes me how much children learn from each other; their peers, siblings and friends. However, I think as adults we also sometimes forget just how much ‘learning’ happens through play! In the nursery we are given daily reminders of the important role that play gives the children as they grow and develop and how pivotal it is to their learning. In the nursery here at Cargilfield, the children have been learning about woodlands and woodland animals and it is incredible to see how much of the children’s learning has been; developed, extended and consolidated through their play.

We see examples of this every day in all sorts of wonderful ways, a few of which I have highlighted here:

All sorts of fantastic art work and den building have taken place over the last few weeks where the children have been able to use their imagination and problem solving skills to create something wonderful. These types of play scenarios are crucial in developing the children’s imagination, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Creativity through play has also been shown in many different contexts this term. The children have created their own self-portraits, made woodland art pictures and scavenged for items to make their own woodland crowns to give just a few examples. These sorts of activities are so important to help brain development in early childhood as they promote cognitive, social and emotional development aswell as helping to develop a range of multi-sensory skills.

perch_rightColBody

The sand and water areas in the nursery have been very popular this term as the children make and test their hypotheses, stretch their imagination and explore their senses through these different mediums. They have been encouraged to lead their own learning to help them develop their physical, cognitive and social skills in a variety of ways. Sand and water have provided the ultimate ‘blank canvas’ to enable this to take place.

The children have already been engaging in the nursery allotment over the last few weeks; planting pumpkin seeds and thinking of ways in which we can help the seeds grow and what we can make/do with the pumpkins once they have grown. Gardening is a fantastic experience which enables the children to discover, learn and explore their natural surroundings. The children are leading the learning in this instance; deciding what we plant, how we might help the seeds to grow and what we want to do with the vegetables which will grow i.e use them to make snack each week in nursery.

Role play and creative drama has also played an important role in the children’s learning so far this term. It is through this type of play that the children are extending their understanding of community, culture and the wider world as they take on different characters in play and learn to empathise and understand the feelings of others as they ‘step’ in to their shoes. We have had some wonderful ‘role play’ so far this term with the children using masks of woodland animals as a prompt to ‘become’ the animal and then searching for food and making houses through their play.

So, when we take a step back and consider ‘How do we learn best?’ let’s not forget about the crucial role that play contributes to a child’s learning and development, something which we are reminded of in the nursery every single day.

JH

perch_signoff
perch_og_titleWhat we learn through play.
perch_og_description
perch_og_image
perch_og_type
authorGivenNameDavid
authorFamilyNameWalker
authorEmaildwalker@cargilfield.com
authorPostCount509
authorSlugdavid-walker
authorImportRef
authorDynamicFields
postURL/news/post.php?s=2018-09-18-what-we-learn-through-play
postURLFullhttp://cargilfield.com/news/post.php?s=2018-09-18-what-we-learn-through-play
perch_item_lasttrue
perch_item_zero_index9
perch_item_index10
perch_item_rev_index1
perch_item_rev_zero_index0
perch_item_oddodd
perch_item_count10
perch_index_in_set10
perch_zero_index_in_set9
perch_namespaceperch:blog
Nursery

What we learn through play.

Creativity through play in the Nursery.

Read More


Posted on


SEE MORE