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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextGood fun down in the Borders!
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2nd Rounders v Loretto and St Mary’s

We played one innings of 20 balls against Loretto. We were fielding first and took a little while to get into our stride. Clara made some super throws form far in the Deep off third base. Loretto batted first and scored 3 1/2 rounders. Saphira went into bat first and hit a super shot straight into the Deep behind third base. She did this again off ball 10. Hannah and Clemmie also scored a half rounder. However, our batting was not quite as good as usual and we ended the match just behind Loretto.

Final score Cargilfield 3, Loretto 3 ½

We were much more proactive in our second match against St Mary’s. We were batting first and this time Saphira, Hannah, Caitlin, Emma, Calia and Bethany all scored. Our fielding was much tighter too although we need to work a bit on making sure we keep the ball ahead of the runner when we are fielding. Again the match was almost too close to call with a narrow win for St Mary’s.

Final score Cargilfield 6, St Mary’s 6 ½

PS a big well done for Lucie who played for Loretto and made a new friend from France at the same time.

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perch_introTextGood fun down in the Borders!
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perch_imageAltRounders
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2nd Rounders v Loretto and St Mary’s

We played one innings of 20 balls against Loretto. We were fielding first and took a little while to get into our stride. Clara made some super throws form far in the Deep off third base. Loretto batted first and scored 3 1/2 rounders. Saphira went into bat first and hit a super shot straight into the Deep behind third base. She did this again off ball 10. Hannah and Clemmie also scored a half rounder. However, our batting was not quite as good as usual and we ended the match just behind Loretto.

Final score Cargilfield 3, Loretto 3 ½

We were much more proactive in our second match against St Mary’s. We were batting first and this time Saphira, Hannah, Caitlin, Emma, Calia and Bethany all scored. Our fielding was much tighter too although we need to work a bit on making sure we keep the ball ahead of the runner when we are fielding. Again the match was almost too close to call with a narrow win for St Mary’s.

Final score Cargilfield 6, St Mary’s 6 ½

PS a big well done for Lucie who played for Loretto and made a new friend from France at the same time.

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Rounders

2nd Rounders v St Mary's and Loretto

Good fun down in the Borders!

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introTextAn important milestone
image/cms/resources/learntoread3.jpg
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Parents often ask how they can help their children with learning to read as they are very aware of what an important role it plays in future academic success. Reading helps develop intellect, increase vocabulary, improve writing and spelling all of which increase self-confidence and build motivation.

Learning to read does not happen overnight. It involves a series of stages and these can begin from when a child is months old. It takes time to pass through these stages and children require systematic teaching and lots of practice to move through them successfully.

The Pre-reader:

  • Likes to look at books and be read to
  • Likes to behave like a reader e.g. holds books and pretends to read them
  • Learns about letters by looking at books, playing with letter blocks or magnetic letters
  • Learns about words from stories, traffic signs and logos on food packages.
  • Learns how text works e.g. where a story starts and finishes and that the print runs from left to right.
  • Begins to understand that their own thoughts can be put into print
  • Uses pictures and memory[cb1] to tell and retell a story

The Emerging Reader

  • Is ready to receive reading instruction
  • Learns that text is a common way to tell a story or to convey information
  • Begins to match written words to spoken words and perceive the relationship between sounds and letters
  • Begins to experiment with reading, and is willing to say words out loud when reading simple texts
  • Finds the pictures helpful in understanding the text, and learns that the words convey a message consistent with the pictures

The Early Reader

  • Develops more confidence and uses a variety of methods such as word building or visual cues to identify words in texts.
  • Adapts reading to different kinds of texts
  • Has an increasingly wide sight vocabulary of words, knows a lot about reading and is willing to try new texts

The Fluent Reader

  • Has an extensive sight vocabulary of words
  • Uses a variety of methods to identify unknown words and their meanings
  • Reads a range of texts and predicts events in a story
  • Relates what is read to their own experience and understands new concepts.

How you can help your child on the journey to becoming a fluent reader?

As a parent you are your child’s first and most important teacher. Reading aloud to children is the best way to get them interested in reading. It is natural to want to compare your child’s reading abilities with those of children of the same age, but not all children develop reading skills at the same pace. What’s important is that you are aware of your child’s reading level so you can chose books and activities which are appropriate and will help develop their skills.

rightColBody

Tip 1: Talk to your child

Oral language is the foundation of reading. Listening and speaking are a child’s first introduction to language. Talk to your child as much as possible about the things you are doing and thinking and encourage them to do the same. Ask them lots of questions, sing songs, playing rhyming and riddle games. Be patient and allow them time to find the words they want to use.

Tip 2: Make Reading Fun

The more you enjoy the reading experience, the more your child will enjoy it. Read aloud with drama and excitement, use different voices for different characters. Re-read favourite books as many times as your child wants to hear them, and choose books from authors your child enjoys. Read stories with repetitive parts and encourage your child to join in. Choose new books together and ensure these cover all the different genres. When reading track the print with your finger so the connection is made between the word on the page and those being heard.

Tip 3: Read Every Day

Children love routine, and reading is something you can both look forward to every day. By taking the time to read with your child, you show them that reading is important as well as fun. Reading with your child is the best thing you can do to help them learn at school. Keep reading to your child even once they are able to read for themselves. This will keep their interest alive and hearing stories they aren’t yet able to access themselves, will stretch understanding and widen knowledge.

Tip 4: Set an Example

As a parents, you are your child’s most important role model. If your child sees you reading, especially for pleasure or information, they will understand that reading is a worthwhile activity. Talking about books is just as important as reading them. Discussing a story or book will help your child understand it and connect it to their own experience of life. It also helps to enrich vocabulary.

Tip 5: Listen to your Child Read

As your child learns to read, listen to them read aloud as often as you can. Choosing a time when there will be no interruptions is essential. As you listen, remember that your reactions are important. Listen without interrupting, be enthusiastic and give specific praise. Patience and encouragement really are key. Guide your child in their choice of books and steer them away from ones which are too difficult. Give your child time to work out tricky words, get them to try the following strategies:

  • Think about what word would make sense in the sentence.
  • Sound the word out
  • Think of a word which looks and sounds similar
  • Look for parts of the word that are familiar
  • Think about which word would sound right in the sentence.
  • Check the pictures and punctuation marks for clues.
  • Go back and read it again
  • Ask for help with the word

Finally, remember you can always ask me or your child’s teacher for help and guidance.

Happy reading!

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perch_introTextAn important milestone
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Parents often ask how they can help their children with learning to read as they are very aware of what an important role it plays in future academic success. Reading helps develop intellect, increase vocabulary, improve writing and spelling all of which increase self-confidence and build motivation.

Learning to read does not happen overnight. It involves a series of stages and these can begin from when a child is months old. It takes time to pass through these stages and children require systematic teaching and lots of practice to move through them successfully.

The Pre-reader:

  • Likes to look at books and be read to
  • Likes to behave like a reader e.g. holds books and pretends to read them
  • Learns about letters by looking at books, playing with letter blocks or magnetic letters
  • Learns about words from stories, traffic signs and logos on food packages.
  • Learns how text works e.g. where a story starts and finishes and that the print runs from left to right.
  • Begins to understand that their own thoughts can be put into print
  • Uses pictures and memory[cb1] to tell and retell a story

The Emerging Reader

  • Is ready to receive reading instruction
  • Learns that text is a common way to tell a story or to convey information
  • Begins to match written words to spoken words and perceive the relationship between sounds and letters
  • Begins to experiment with reading, and is willing to say words out loud when reading simple texts
  • Finds the pictures helpful in understanding the text, and learns that the words convey a message consistent with the pictures

The Early Reader

  • Develops more confidence and uses a variety of methods such as word building or visual cues to identify words in texts.
  • Adapts reading to different kinds of texts
  • Has an increasingly wide sight vocabulary of words, knows a lot about reading and is willing to try new texts

The Fluent Reader

  • Has an extensive sight vocabulary of words
  • Uses a variety of methods to identify unknown words and their meanings
  • Reads a range of texts and predicts events in a story
  • Relates what is read to their own experience and understands new concepts.

How you can help your child on the journey to becoming a fluent reader?

As a parent you are your child’s first and most important teacher. Reading aloud to children is the best way to get them interested in reading. It is natural to want to compare your child’s reading abilities with those of children of the same age, but not all children develop reading skills at the same pace. What’s important is that you are aware of your child’s reading level so you can chose books and activities which are appropriate and will help develop their skills.

perch_rightColBody

Tip 1: Talk to your child

Oral language is the foundation of reading. Listening and speaking are a child’s first introduction to language. Talk to your child as much as possible about the things you are doing and thinking and encourage them to do the same. Ask them lots of questions, sing songs, playing rhyming and riddle games. Be patient and allow them time to find the words they want to use.

Tip 2: Make Reading Fun

The more you enjoy the reading experience, the more your child will enjoy it. Read aloud with drama and excitement, use different voices for different characters. Re-read favourite books as many times as your child wants to hear them, and choose books from authors your child enjoys. Read stories with repetitive parts and encourage your child to join in. Choose new books together and ensure these cover all the different genres. When reading track the print with your finger so the connection is made between the word on the page and those being heard.

Tip 3: Read Every Day

Children love routine, and reading is something you can both look forward to every day. By taking the time to read with your child, you show them that reading is important as well as fun. Reading with your child is the best thing you can do to help them learn at school. Keep reading to your child even once they are able to read for themselves. This will keep their interest alive and hearing stories they aren’t yet able to access themselves, will stretch understanding and widen knowledge.

Tip 4: Set an Example

As a parents, you are your child’s most important role model. If your child sees you reading, especially for pleasure or information, they will understand that reading is a worthwhile activity. Talking about books is just as important as reading them. Discussing a story or book will help your child understand it and connect it to their own experience of life. It also helps to enrich vocabulary.

Tip 5: Listen to your Child Read

As your child learns to read, listen to them read aloud as often as you can. Choosing a time when there will be no interruptions is essential. As you listen, remember that your reactions are important. Listen without interrupting, be enthusiastic and give specific praise. Patience and encouragement really are key. Guide your child in their choice of books and steer them away from ones which are too difficult. Give your child time to work out tricky words, get them to try the following strategies:

  • Think about what word would make sense in the sentence.
  • Sound the word out
  • Think of a word which looks and sounds similar
  • Look for parts of the word that are familiar
  • Think about which word would sound right in the sentence.
  • Check the pictures and punctuation marks for clues.
  • Go back and read it again
  • Ask for help with the word

Finally, remember you can always ask me or your child’s teacher for help and guidance.

Happy reading!

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Cargilfield

A Parents’ Guide to Teaching Early Reading Skills

An important milestone

Read More


Posted on

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextFun and Games in the Classroom!
image/cms/resources/55725e35-7b46-4d4b-b622-5adc08dc43be.jpeg
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I often get asked what it’s like being a pre-prep teacher, spending your days ‘colouring in’, ‘singing songs’ or ‘getting out toys for lessons’. And I often take people aback with the perfectly truthful answer of ‘it is all just great fun actually!’

Now you may be wondering why we take primary education so seriously if this is all we achieve in P2 from a Monday to a Friday but actually it goes much deeper than a superficial front of fun and games, underpinning what is quite possibly at the very heart of all education. Developing and fostering a love of learning right from the very beginning.

That love of learning is exactly what the P2’s would be bursting to tell you all about from last term. Take the time we have got our hands, face and smiles covered in paint discovering the fun the North and South of a magnet can have (not so much ‘love’ from the cleaner we admit!). Or how about when we turned our classroom into a ‘real’ space ship, witnessing a live conversation from astronauts aboard the ISS and undertaking a series of astronaut tasks, learning that team working is an essential (but not always easy!) part of any job. The space journals we wrote leading on from this certainly produced some impressively detailed and opinionated pieces of writing.

They’ll also be more than keen to show you the planet orbit dance we learnt, which whilst making us all dizzy, showed us how the Moon and Earth orbit the Sun making days, months and years! Or ask them to fill you in about the time a herbivore made lodge in our classroom at night causing daily classroom chaos! The descriptive story writing produced from this adventure certainly echoed the excitement and enthusiasm the children had from their imaginations. Taking our ‘fun and games’ outside has also let us explore the real length in meters and centimeters of some of the world’s largest dinosaurs. Even at arm’s length, standing in a line we weren’t as big as an Argentinosaurus! How did this creature even fit between trees was one of the questions raised! The fun and enjoyment found in all these activities has allowed the children to explore, question and wonder. Possibly the three key ingredients for really developing a love of learning no matter what the age.

rightColBody

I thought I’d asked P2 what they ‘loved about their learning at school so far this year’ and these were some of their replies…

‘All the story writing we do because we always have the most fun before it’

‘When the spaceship landed in the classroom and we got to see what being a real astronaut is like… it wasn’t easy!’

‘When the dinosaur came into our classroom and we set up a camera to catch him!’ shortly followed by ‘oh I know, when I wrote about the dinosaur knocking over Mr Taylor’s picture of Mrs Taylor in his office!’

Story writing certainly featured high on their love list and it was clearly through the exploration, excitement and more simply ‘fun’ they had in the build up to these pieces of work.

So whilst it may be all ‘fun and games’ down in a primary classroom there is no doubt that laying down the foundations for a love of learning is definitely the successful route for developing enquiring and inquisitive individuals. We certainly have a year group full of just those sorts of individuals! Every game played to help our maths, song sang to remember our spellings or toy used to engage our brains is the very foundations for keeping that love for learning going right through to our old age. Now I wonder where our love for learning will take us this term!?

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I often get asked what it’s like being a pre-prep teacher, spending your days ‘colouring in’, ‘singing songs’ or ‘getting out toys for lessons’. And I often take people aback with the perfectly truthful answer of ‘it is all just great fun actually!’

Now you may be wondering why we take primary education so seriously if this is all we achieve in P2 from a Monday to a Friday but actually it goes much deeper than a superficial front of fun and games, underpinning what is quite possibly at the very heart of all education. Developing and fostering a love of learning right from the very beginning.

That love of learning is exactly what the P2’s would be bursting to tell you all about from last term. Take the time we have got our hands, face and smiles covered in paint discovering the fun the North and South of a magnet can have (not so much ‘love’ from the cleaner we admit!). Or how about when we turned our classroom into a ‘real’ space ship, witnessing a live conversation from astronauts aboard the ISS and undertaking a series of astronaut tasks, learning that team working is an essential (but not always easy!) part of any job. The space journals we wrote leading on from this certainly produced some impressively detailed and opinionated pieces of writing.

They’ll also be more than keen to show you the planet orbit dance we learnt, which whilst making us all dizzy, showed us how the Moon and Earth orbit the Sun making days, months and years! Or ask them to fill you in about the time a herbivore made lodge in our classroom at night causing daily classroom chaos! The descriptive story writing produced from this adventure certainly echoed the excitement and enthusiasm the children had from their imaginations. Taking our ‘fun and games’ outside has also let us explore the real length in meters and centimeters of some of the world’s largest dinosaurs. Even at arm’s length, standing in a line we weren’t as big as an Argentinosaurus! How did this creature even fit between trees was one of the questions raised! The fun and enjoyment found in all these activities has allowed the children to explore, question and wonder. Possibly the three key ingredients for really developing a love of learning no matter what the age.

perch_rightColBody

I thought I’d asked P2 what they ‘loved about their learning at school so far this year’ and these were some of their replies…

‘All the story writing we do because we always have the most fun before it’

‘When the spaceship landed in the classroom and we got to see what being a real astronaut is like… it wasn’t easy!’

‘When the dinosaur came into our classroom and we set up a camera to catch him!’ shortly followed by ‘oh I know, when I wrote about the dinosaur knocking over Mr Taylor’s picture of Mrs Taylor in his office!’

Story writing certainly featured high on their love list and it was clearly through the exploration, excitement and more simply ‘fun’ they had in the build up to these pieces of work.

So whilst it may be all ‘fun and games’ down in a primary classroom there is no doubt that laying down the foundations for a love of learning is definitely the successful route for developing enquiring and inquisitive individuals. We certainly have a year group full of just those sorts of individuals! Every game played to help our maths, song sang to remember our spellings or toy used to engage our brains is the very foundations for keeping that love for learning going right through to our old age. Now I wonder where our love for learning will take us this term!?

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Cargilfield

Life as a P2 teacher

Fun and Games in the Classroom!

Read More


Posted on

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextBuilding blocks of language
image/cms/resources/dcd05293-7adc-4a03-8759-64d4c3b8eea9.jpeg
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Un mot ...Un jour...

Words are the building blocks of language and apparently mastering 500 of them would give us fluency in any foreign language. Easy you might say, but if you think about it which 500 words are you going to choose to learn? …

Well, at Cargilfield we like to introduce children to a new language right from Nursery and this is where they will start their learning journey towards 500 words. At this early stage we start with the basics, we learn how to introduce ourselves, the colours, we learn to count and sing songs. Just listening to a new language will give children an ear for the different tones.

I like to call it “La pyramide inversée”

For example:

P3    deux, soleil, jaune, chaud

P2                        Soleil, jaune, chaud

P1                                       Soleil, jaune

Nursery                                   Jaune

By the time the children reach F4 not only are they very comfortable with all classroom instructions and vocabulary, but they also have the basic tools and vocabulary for all the different topics that common entrance covers.

Using the classroom vocabulary below, perhaps you would like to try to have a go at the pyramid, and see how many words you already know?

IwSLLUJRH5GtLTNcJz3eWjl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9

Coming back to our 500 words and deciding which ones would be appropriate to learn, I have worked with F4 children on creating a “one word a day perpetual calendar”, they all have independently chosen a word in English and translated it in French. We pushed the activity a little further by creating a French writing template, trying to handwrite like French children, understanding the gender of the word and finally they wrote the word in their own phonetic way, so whoever will read the word can also work out the correct pronunciation!!


Image 1

Image

We are still very far away from 500 words but next term F5 and F6 will follow in the F4 footsteps et ainsi de suite....

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Un mot ...Un jour...

Words are the building blocks of language and apparently mastering 500 of them would give us fluency in any foreign language. Easy you might say, but if you think about it which 500 words are you going to choose to learn? …

Well, at Cargilfield we like to introduce children to a new language right from Nursery and this is where they will start their learning journey towards 500 words. At this early stage we start with the basics, we learn how to introduce ourselves, the colours, we learn to count and sing songs. Just listening to a new language will give children an ear for the different tones.

I like to call it “La pyramide inversée”

For example:

P3    deux, soleil, jaune, chaud

P2                        Soleil, jaune, chaud

P1                                       Soleil, jaune

Nursery                                   Jaune

By the time the children reach F4 not only are they very comfortable with all classroom instructions and vocabulary, but they also have the basic tools and vocabulary for all the different topics that common entrance covers.

Using the classroom vocabulary below, perhaps you would like to try to have a go at the pyramid, and see how many words you already know?

IwSLLUJRH5GtLTNcJz3eWjl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9

Coming back to our 500 words and deciding which ones would be appropriate to learn, I have worked with F4 children on creating a “one word a day perpetual calendar”, they all have independently chosen a word in English and translated it in French. We pushed the activity a little further by creating a French writing template, trying to handwrite like French children, understanding the gender of the word and finally they wrote the word in their own phonetic way, so whoever will read the word can also work out the correct pronunciation!!


Image 1

Image

We are still very far away from 500 words but next term F5 and F6 will follow in the F4 footsteps et ainsi de suite....

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French

Beginning to learn French

Building blocks of language

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introTextLots of learning and discovery!
image/cms/resources/f84975b3-bdd5-44c6-bfd2-d217d50fc4e7.jpeg
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What is going on in the Science Department? Well, apart from learning about the standard Biology, Chemistry and Physics, there is a drive to improve the thinking and problem solving skills of the children. You may recognise this as a large part of the scientific approach in any case, with the need to develop a hypothesis, design and carry out an experiment and conclude on the findings. However we have been trying to widen the children’s experience to help their thinking, and to stimulate their interest in Science.

As educators we have the job of trying to prepare children for their future life, but it is very difficult to know exactly what their lives will look like. With the pace of change and the current uncertainty about the political landscape, who knows? It is likely that a high proportion of these children will end up working in jobs that are unfamiliar to us today; indeed, they may not even exist currently. It is therefore very important that we provide them with opportunities to improve their ability to think things through and help them to be able to tackle problems that they have not come across before.

Science aims to stimulate our curiosity in finding out why things happen and it teaches methods of enquiry and investigation to stimulate our critical and creative thought. These will be valuable skills for the future.

The British Science Week gave Form Four and Five the chance to carry out some new and interesting activities. On Friday 15 September we spent all day working on a wide range of different STEM activities (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

We investigated the sneeze zone- how far a sneeze can travel and how we can prevent others from getting ill. We were able to learn about the spread of microbes and their potential to infect people.

The ability to be able to come up with new ways to tackle infection is a critical area in medicine today. 

7890204C 6676 4EFF 93FE CD67E7E02783

We investigated the problem of microfibres in fleece material and were horrified to discover that these microfibres get into our own food chain. This issue links with the need to raise awareness of the importance of looking after our environment. As the WWF advertisement says”we are the first generation that knows we are destroying the world and could be the last that could do anything about it”. Mr. Stephen ran a Dragons’ Den style activity which invited groups of children to design a possible solution to the problem of plastic waste, and pitch for the investment required to take their idea forward. 

7A103BFC 09EC 4C6D 90F7 CE461BBFB928

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We also explored static electricity and discovered that is used to help reduce pollution from smoke stacks and in other challenging environments. We looked at a photo on an electrostatic precipator but probably preferred the twelve different stations where we were able to experiment with static electrify! 

AB1FB94A 2A36 4E3C B2E6 C366624C355E

Engineering came to the fore when we were challenged to build the best paper airplanes and also the highest possible tower using only spaghetti and marshmallows and, of course, our knowledge of the triangle as a very stable building base. 

870004C1 B822 4B74 A294 37C08BCD90FF

It was a very successful day, enjoyed by all the children. Perhaps the best moment for me was when a young girl said to me that she had never thought that she could be an engineer. Well, why not?

In the Summer Term we will be building a simulated neuron network to help us understand how when we learn something new, neurons in our brains make new connections. This links with research into Alzheimer’s disease, which is forecast to grow rapidly. One million people in the UK will have dementia by 2025 and this will increase to two million by 2050. (Alzheimer’s Research UK)

Form Five Maths plan to carry out a Waste Audit, identifying the waste that is sent to landfill. They will also carry out a Plastic Waste Audit. Both sets of data will be reviewed later in the year and we hope that we will see an improvement.

Science and Maths are very useful in helping the children learn how to investigate problems and how to use a structured method to do so. Ensuring that they are able to be creative is also part of this process. It is quite likely that some of the children at Cargilfield will go on to make a significant contribution to the problems of the future. Hopefully we can help give them some of the skills to do so.

Fiona MacKerron

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What is going on in the Science Department? Well, apart from learning about the standard Biology, Chemistry and Physics, there is a drive to improve the thinking and problem solving skills of the children. You may recognise this as a large part of the scientific approach in any case, with the need to develop a hypothesis, design and carry out an experiment and conclude on the findings. However we have been trying to widen the children’s experience to help their thinking, and to stimulate their interest in Science.

As educators we have the job of trying to prepare children for their future life, but it is very difficult to know exactly what their lives will look like. With the pace of change and the current uncertainty about the political landscape, who knows? It is likely that a high proportion of these children will end up working in jobs that are unfamiliar to us today; indeed, they may not even exist currently. It is therefore very important that we provide them with opportunities to improve their ability to think things through and help them to be able to tackle problems that they have not come across before.

Science aims to stimulate our curiosity in finding out why things happen and it teaches methods of enquiry and investigation to stimulate our critical and creative thought. These will be valuable skills for the future.

The British Science Week gave Form Four and Five the chance to carry out some new and interesting activities. On Friday 15 September we spent all day working on a wide range of different STEM activities (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

We investigated the sneeze zone- how far a sneeze can travel and how we can prevent others from getting ill. We were able to learn about the spread of microbes and their potential to infect people.

The ability to be able to come up with new ways to tackle infection is a critical area in medicine today. 

7890204C 6676 4EFF 93FE CD67E7E02783

We investigated the problem of microfibres in fleece material and were horrified to discover that these microfibres get into our own food chain. This issue links with the need to raise awareness of the importance of looking after our environment. As the WWF advertisement says”we are the first generation that knows we are destroying the world and could be the last that could do anything about it”. Mr. Stephen ran a Dragons’ Den style activity which invited groups of children to design a possible solution to the problem of plastic waste, and pitch for the investment required to take their idea forward. 

7A103BFC 09EC 4C6D 90F7 CE461BBFB928

perch_rightColBody

We also explored static electricity and discovered that is used to help reduce pollution from smoke stacks and in other challenging environments. We looked at a photo on an electrostatic precipator but probably preferred the twelve different stations where we were able to experiment with static electrify! 

AB1FB94A 2A36 4E3C B2E6 C366624C355E

Engineering came to the fore when we were challenged to build the best paper airplanes and also the highest possible tower using only spaghetti and marshmallows and, of course, our knowledge of the triangle as a very stable building base. 

870004C1 B822 4B74 A294 37C08BCD90FF

It was a very successful day, enjoyed by all the children. Perhaps the best moment for me was when a young girl said to me that she had never thought that she could be an engineer. Well, why not?

In the Summer Term we will be building a simulated neuron network to help us understand how when we learn something new, neurons in our brains make new connections. This links with research into Alzheimer’s disease, which is forecast to grow rapidly. One million people in the UK will have dementia by 2025 and this will increase to two million by 2050. (Alzheimer’s Research UK)

Form Five Maths plan to carry out a Waste Audit, identifying the waste that is sent to landfill. They will also carry out a Plastic Waste Audit. Both sets of data will be reviewed later in the year and we hope that we will see an improvement.

Science and Maths are very useful in helping the children learn how to investigate problems and how to use a structured method to do so. Ensuring that they are able to be creative is also part of this process. It is quite likely that some of the children at Cargilfield will go on to make a significant contribution to the problems of the future. Hopefully we can help give them some of the skills to do so.

Fiona MacKerron

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Science

Science Day at Cargilfield

Lots of learning and discovery!

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextSounds and Spellings in P1
image/cms/resources/unknown-3.jpeg
imageAltPre Prep
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“Sooper fox is zooming doun in her jet pouwerd boot.”

“The see animls have been capcherd by the rued soap tub.”

“Traction man flies on to the cooshuns with his majic caip.”

“Youch screemed the eevl wien glases loudly and off they ran.”

“Sooper gerl saivd us screemd the see animils.”

“Laizer ies cratee cicks the eevl chears and of thai dug away.”

P1 have been story writing this term, a mere 6 months after learning how to write their very first sounds. Some examples of sentences from their story writing are above.

Learning to write is no easy task. The English language may have 26 letters but our language is made up of 44 phonemes, or sounds. It is these 44 sounds that children need to know how to write.

Some, like s, are pretty simple. In the P1 classrooms we learn a song, an action and play games and practise writing the sound and these can be picked up quickly. Some are trickier, like ai, where two letters join together to make one sound.

As we know as adults however, it doesn’t stop there. Although there are 44 phonemes in the English language, most of these phonemes can be spelled in more than one way. Take the long ‘ee’ sound for example. This can be spelled:

e as in be, ee as in bee, ea as in meat, y as in lady, ey as in key, oe as in phoenix , ie as in grief, i as in ski, ei as in deceive, eo as in people, ay as in quay

Tricky indeed! In the teaching of phonics and writing in the pre-prep these sounds and rules are introduced to the children slowly. We start with the ‘ee’ sound and teach only this sound, although the children are aware there are other ways of writing this. You can see above the children writing the word ‘see’ when it should be ‘sea’. Once this is secure, we introduce the ‘y’ at the end of the word, like in the word ‘happy’. This is a useful and easy to understand rule for them.

This slow, step by step approach works and importantly the children have belief in their ability to write from the very beginning. The children in P1 are writing stories, letters, poetry and much more thanks to this relaxed and step by step approach. They know they don’t know all the spelling rules yet but that doesn’t stop them.

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“Sooper fox is zooming doun in her jet pouwerd boot.”

“The see animls have been capcherd by the rued soap tub.”

“Traction man flies on to the cooshuns with his majic caip.”

“Youch screemed the eevl wien glases loudly and off they ran.”

“Sooper gerl saivd us screemd the see animils.”

“Laizer ies cratee cicks the eevl chears and of thai dug away.”

P1 have been story writing this term, a mere 6 months after learning how to write their very first sounds. Some examples of sentences from their story writing are above.

Learning to write is no easy task. The English language may have 26 letters but our language is made up of 44 phonemes, or sounds. It is these 44 sounds that children need to know how to write.

Some, like s, are pretty simple. In the P1 classrooms we learn a song, an action and play games and practise writing the sound and these can be picked up quickly. Some are trickier, like ai, where two letters join together to make one sound.

As we know as adults however, it doesn’t stop there. Although there are 44 phonemes in the English language, most of these phonemes can be spelled in more than one way. Take the long ‘ee’ sound for example. This can be spelled:

e as in be, ee as in bee, ea as in meat, y as in lady, ey as in key, oe as in phoenix , ie as in grief, i as in ski, ei as in deceive, eo as in people, ay as in quay

Tricky indeed! In the teaching of phonics and writing in the pre-prep these sounds and rules are introduced to the children slowly. We start with the ‘ee’ sound and teach only this sound, although the children are aware there are other ways of writing this. You can see above the children writing the word ‘see’ when it should be ‘sea’. Once this is secure, we introduce the ‘y’ at the end of the word, like in the word ‘happy’. This is a useful and easy to understand rule for them.

This slow, step by step approach works and importantly the children have belief in their ability to write from the very beginning. The children in P1 are writing stories, letters, poetry and much more thanks to this relaxed and step by step approach. They know they don’t know all the spelling rules yet but that doesn’t stop them.

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Pre Prep

Learning to spell

Sounds and Spellings in P1

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perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
introTextThoughts about moving up to Form 4
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P3 is an interesting year group to take on. The last year group in the Pre Prep, it is around this time of year that we start looking at moving up to the Upper School and all the things that come with that. Below are some thoughts from P3Y about this year and what they are looking forward to in the Upper School.

What has been your favourite lesson/subject of P3?

Art is my favourite subject because we have been making roman helmets – George

I like P.E. because we have been learning about tennis – Monty

Maths is good because its is quite challenging and challenges are good for me. – Wolfie

I like maths because I like adding and multiplication. I like using hundreds, tens and units to help me out – Iain

I like maths because we have been learning how to use money with coins. – Abbie Rose

I like writing because we wrote stories about the Bear and the Hare and we wrote about our visit to the Roman museum. – Emilia

I like topic because we have been learning about the Romans. My favourite bit was when we had a visit from the Roman soldier. – Matthjis

I like art because sometimes it’s a surprise and its really fun. – Beatrice

I liked writing about the Farm visit on the iPads – Archie

I like P.E. because we get to go on the soft mats and do gymnastics – Sasha

I liked it when the Roman soldier came and we got to try out his armour. – Alexander

I liked it when we drew the outlines of each other to create our own full sized Roman Soldier. – Malysa

My favourite bit of topic was designing our Roman shields. – Gabriella

I like topic because we got to make Roman soldiers – Dexter

I like music because we are starting to learn how to play the recorder – Maxi

I like topic because we got a visit from a Roman soldier. He taught us how to march!

rightColBody

What are you looking forward to in Form 4?

I’m looking forward to doing the 500 word story writing competition. – Alexander

I’m looking forward to doing more joined up handwriting. – Abbie Rose

I’m excited to try the new uniform. – Malysa

I’m looking forward to doing more sports and learning about decimals. – Wilfred

I’m looking forward to walking to classes by myself. – Everyone

I’m looking forward to having more French. – Gabriella

I’m looking forward to meeting new friends. – Everyone

Is there anything you are going to miss about the Pre Prep?

I’ll miss filling out my merit card. – Maxi

I will miss all the nice teachers – Everyone

I’ll miss Miss Younger. – Everyone

I will miss having special table at Friday lunch times. – Everyone

I will miss Scottish Country Dancing with Mrs Brockbank. – Gabriella

I will miss story time at the end of the day. – Abbie Rose

So there you have it! There is some definite excitement about what next year will bring but P3 should know that they are always welcome to come down to the Pre-Prep to see their old teachers when they are in Form 4. It is only a short walk away!

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perch_leftColBody

P3 is an interesting year group to take on. The last year group in the Pre Prep, it is around this time of year that we start looking at moving up to the Upper School and all the things that come with that. Below are some thoughts from P3Y about this year and what they are looking forward to in the Upper School.

What has been your favourite lesson/subject of P3?

Art is my favourite subject because we have been making roman helmets – George

I like P.E. because we have been learning about tennis – Monty

Maths is good because its is quite challenging and challenges are good for me. – Wolfie

I like maths because I like adding and multiplication. I like using hundreds, tens and units to help me out – Iain

I like maths because we have been learning how to use money with coins. – Abbie Rose

I like writing because we wrote stories about the Bear and the Hare and we wrote about our visit to the Roman museum. – Emilia

I like topic because we have been learning about the Romans. My favourite bit was when we had a visit from the Roman soldier. – Matthjis

I like art because sometimes it’s a surprise and its really fun. – Beatrice

I liked writing about the Farm visit on the iPads – Archie

I like P.E. because we get to go on the soft mats and do gymnastics – Sasha

I liked it when the Roman soldier came and we got to try out his armour. – Alexander

I liked it when we drew the outlines of each other to create our own full sized Roman Soldier. – Malysa

My favourite bit of topic was designing our Roman shields. – Gabriella

I like topic because we got to make Roman soldiers – Dexter

I like music because we are starting to learn how to play the recorder – Maxi

I like topic because we got a visit from a Roman soldier. He taught us how to march!

perch_rightColBody

What are you looking forward to in Form 4?

I’m looking forward to doing the 500 word story writing competition. – Alexander

I’m looking forward to doing more joined up handwriting. – Abbie Rose

I’m excited to try the new uniform. – Malysa

I’m looking forward to doing more sports and learning about decimals. – Wilfred

I’m looking forward to walking to classes by myself. – Everyone

I’m looking forward to having more French. – Gabriella

I’m looking forward to meeting new friends. – Everyone

Is there anything you are going to miss about the Pre Prep?

I’ll miss filling out my merit card. – Maxi

I will miss all the nice teachers – Everyone

I’ll miss Miss Younger. – Everyone

I will miss having special table at Friday lunch times. – Everyone

I will miss Scottish Country Dancing with Mrs Brockbank. – Gabriella

I will miss story time at the end of the day. – Abbie Rose

So there you have it! There is some definite excitement about what next year will bring but P3 should know that they are always welcome to come down to the Pre-Prep to see their old teachers when they are in Form 4. It is only a short walk away!

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Pre Prep

A Q and A with P3Y

Thoughts about moving up to Form 4

Read More


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introTextChildren are used to these terms at Cargilfield
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Cargilfield Mathematics ‘Patter’

There can be many different names for the same operation or calculation in Mathematics, and this can lead to confusion or even anxiety. The quick guide below details some of the more common methods used in Mathematics lessons in the Upper School, and the names by which they are known.

1. ‘Hats’ (^) and ‘Hops’

    • The hats method is used to multiply decimals.
    • - A hat sign ^ is placed above each digit after the decimal point (and the number of hats noted in brackets).
    • - The decimal points are removed and the numbers are multiplied.
    • - The answer is written down and correct number of hats placed back on top of the digits, working from the right.
    • - The final answer is written without hats.

    Untitled1

    • The hops method is used to divide by decimals.

    Example: 3.13 ÷ 0.02

      

    The decimal point hops two to the right in both numbers, giving 313 ÷ 2.

                              

    rightColBody
    1. 2. ‘Bus stop’ division

    The bus stop method is a simple way to divide; the name refers to the lines drawn in front of and on top of the number to be divided, which form the shape of a bus stop.

    Untitled1

    1. 3. ‘Piggy-back’ division

    To divide by larger numbers, the children are encouraged to use factor pairs.

    Example: 10134 ÷ 18

    The number 10134 would be divided by a pair of factors (3 and 6) which, multiplied, give the product 18 (2 and 9 could also be used).

    Untitled

    1. 4. Napier Bones

    A grid method (named after the 16th century Edinburgh mathematician John Napier) is used for long multiplication.

    Complete the multiplication grid square, then add the columns diagonally, beginning at the bottom right, to get the final answer.

    Untitled

    FMac

    28.2.19

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    Cargilfield Mathematics ‘Patter’

    There can be many different names for the same operation or calculation in Mathematics, and this can lead to confusion or even anxiety. The quick guide below details some of the more common methods used in Mathematics lessons in the Upper School, and the names by which they are known.

    1. ‘Hats’ (^) and ‘Hops’

      • The hats method is used to multiply decimals.
      • - A hat sign ^ is placed above each digit after the decimal point (and the number of hats noted in brackets).
      • - The decimal points are removed and the numbers are multiplied.
      • - The answer is written down and correct number of hats placed back on top of the digits, working from the right.
      • - The final answer is written without hats.

      Untitled1

      • The hops method is used to divide by decimals.

      Example: 3.13 ÷ 0.02

        

      The decimal point hops two to the right in both numbers, giving 313 ÷ 2.

                                

      perch_rightColBody
      1. 2. ‘Bus stop’ division

      The bus stop method is a simple way to divide; the name refers to the lines drawn in front of and on top of the number to be divided, which form the shape of a bus stop.

      Untitled1

      1. 3. ‘Piggy-back’ division

      To divide by larger numbers, the children are encouraged to use factor pairs.

      Example: 10134 ÷ 18

      The number 10134 would be divided by a pair of factors (3 and 6) which, multiplied, give the product 18 (2 and 9 could also be used).

      Untitled

      1. 4. Napier Bones

      A grid method (named after the 16th century Edinburgh mathematician John Napier) is used for long multiplication.

      Complete the multiplication grid square, then add the columns diagonally, beginning at the bottom right, to get the final answer.

      Untitled

      FMac

      28.2.19

      perch_signoff
      perch_og_titleThe Language of Maths!
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      Maths

      The Language of Maths!

      Children are used to these terms at Cargilfield

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      Posted on

      IDValue
      perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
      introTextTolerance and understanding needed
      image/cms/resources/7cbc9d2c-cf5d-40f6-a4e2-2291f81edaab.jpeg
      imageAltReligion
      leftColBody

      I always brace myself for the response to when I ask the question, “what do you know about Islam?” for I never quite know what I might get.  As predicted, the word ISIS is mentioned and I know at that point, that whatever I planned that lesson, will go right out the window.  For this is what I love about teaching Religious Studies.  Not only is it a chance to impart knowledge of the world’s major religions (brag over), but more importantly it is an opportunity to right the misconceptions that are forever being raised by platformssuch as social media and the press, in order to create a “good story”.  

      In a world that is ever changing, one can’t open a newspaper without some reference to religion and as such, tolerance has never been more important.  And whilst history is full of blood and violence where religion is concerned, whether it is the Babylonian wars in Old Testament times (studied in Forms 5 and 6), the Crusades, the martyrdom of Sikhism, the conflict during India’s independence and the Holocaust, each religion has its part to play in the history of religious conflict.  After all, as the saying goes, one man’s terrorist, is another man’s freedom fighter.  There is no doubt that interpretation has a lot to answer to, as does the culture versus religion debate; these latter two are not synonymous and will forever be an ongoing battle to separate.

      And that is why the teaching of religion is now, more than ever, such a vital part of the overall education of the young generation coming though.  Whatever the reasoning behind these events, our children need to understand that at the heart of all faith are the core values – treating others well and living a life in the way that fulfils this.  The very slim minority that don’t do this should not taint the vast majority of those that do, and this is what I hope the children of Cargilfield understand.

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      perch_imageAltReligion
      perch_leftColBody

      I always brace myself for the response to when I ask the question, “what do you know about Islam?” for I never quite know what I might get.  As predicted, the word ISIS is mentioned and I know at that point, that whatever I planned that lesson, will go right out the window.  For this is what I love about teaching Religious Studies.  Not only is it a chance to impart knowledge of the world’s major religions (brag over), but more importantly it is an opportunity to right the misconceptions that are forever being raised by platformssuch as social media and the press, in order to create a “good story”.  

      In a world that is ever changing, one can’t open a newspaper without some reference to religion and as such, tolerance has never been more important.  And whilst history is full of blood and violence where religion is concerned, whether it is the Babylonian wars in Old Testament times (studied in Forms 5 and 6), the Crusades, the martyrdom of Sikhism, the conflict during India’s independence and the Holocaust, each religion has its part to play in the history of religious conflict.  After all, as the saying goes, one man’s terrorist, is another man’s freedom fighter.  There is no doubt that interpretation has a lot to answer to, as does the culture versus religion debate; these latter two are not synonymous and will forever be an ongoing battle to separate.

      And that is why the teaching of religion is now, more than ever, such a vital part of the overall education of the young generation coming though.  Whatever the reasoning behind these events, our children need to understand that at the heart of all faith are the core values – treating others well and living a life in the way that fulfils this.  The very slim minority that don’t do this should not taint the vast majority of those that do, and this is what I hope the children of Cargilfield understand.

      perch_rightColBody
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      perch_og_titleImportance of teaching religion
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      Religion

      Importance of teaching religion

      Tolerance and understanding needed

      Read More


      Posted on

      IDValue
      perch_page_path/teaching-and-learning/news/archive.php
      introTextLearning skills for life!
      image/cms/resources/dsc00783.jpg
      imageAltScience
      leftColBody

      Science is a wonderful subject – a subject of exploration and questions. Investigations are utilised to provide proof for theories and in the process life skills are learned. This term children have already developed skills in: observing, predicting, interpreting, making hypotheses, classifying, communicating, recording, fair testing and drawing conclusions from the evidence provided.

      During the experimental process pupils are all encouraged to respect evidence, tolerate uncertainty, reflect critically, perseverance, be creative, be open minded and work co-operatively.

      The children enjoy the opportunity to partake in practical experimentation, and where possible there is a practical element to every lesson. The art of recording an experiment in the form of a ‘write up’ brings the children into a world-wide accepted form of scientific language and ‘lay out’. They are learning to be a part of an academically driven, developmental, thoughtfully rigorous world community – and all this is in preparation for their Common Entrance Exams and Public School Scholarship.

      It is interesting, watching the news and listening to the radio, and then reflecting upon how many of our politicians in these uncertain times are utilising the skills listed above – skills that many of them will have honed in their own science lessons while at school.


      DD

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      not_last_pagetrue
      perch_introTextLearning skills for life!
      perch_image/cms/resources/dsc00783.jpg
      perch_imageAltScience
      perch_leftColBody

      Science is a wonderful subject – a subject of exploration and questions. Investigations are utilised to provide proof for theories and in the process life skills are learned. This term children have already developed skills in: observing, predicting, interpreting, making hypotheses, classifying, communicating, recording, fair testing and drawing conclusions from the evidence provided.

      During the experimental process pupils are all encouraged to respect evidence, tolerate uncertainty, reflect critically, perseverance, be creative, be open minded and work co-operatively.

      The children enjoy the opportunity to partake in practical experimentation, and where possible there is a practical element to every lesson. The art of recording an experiment in the form of a ‘write up’ brings the children into a world-wide accepted form of scientific language and ‘lay out’. They are learning to be a part of an academically driven, developmental, thoughtfully rigorous world community – and all this is in preparation for their Common Entrance Exams and Public School Scholarship.

      It is interesting, watching the news and listening to the radio, and then reflecting upon how many of our politicians in these uncertain times are utilising the skills listed above – skills that many of them will have honed in their own science lessons while at school.


      DD

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      Science

      Science is all around us

      Learning skills for life!

      Read More


      Posted on


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