Archive of: February, 2019

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Cargilfield Mathematics ‘Patter’

There can be many different names for the same operation or calculation in Mathematics, and this can lead to confusion or even anxiety. The quick guide below details some of the more common methods used in Mathematics lessons in the Upper School, and the names by which they are known.

1. ‘Hats’ (^) and ‘Hops’

    • The hats method is used to multiply decimals.
    • - A hat sign ^ is placed above each digit after the decimal point (and the number of hats noted in brackets).
    • - The decimal points are removed and the numbers are multiplied.
    • - The answer is written down and correct number of hats placed back on top of the digits, working from the right.
    • - The final answer is written without hats.

    Untitled1

    • The hops method is used to divide by decimals.

    Example: 3.13 ÷ 0.02

      

    The decimal point hops two to the right in both numbers, giving 313 ÷ 2.

                              

    rightColBody
    1. 2. ‘Bus stop’ division

    The bus stop method is a simple way to divide; the name refers to the lines drawn in front of and on top of the number to be divided, which form the shape of a bus stop.

    Untitled1

    1. 3. ‘Piggy-back’ division

    To divide by larger numbers, the children are encouraged to use factor pairs.

    Example: 10134 ÷ 18

    The number 10134 would be divided by a pair of factors (3 and 6) which, multiplied, give the product 18 (2 and 9 could also be used).

    Untitled

    1. 4. Napier Bones

    A grid method (named after the 16th century Edinburgh mathematician John Napier) is used for long multiplication.

    Complete the multiplication grid square, then add the columns diagonally, beginning at the bottom right, to get the final answer.

    Untitled

    FMac

    28.2.19

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    perch_introTextChildren are used to these terms at Cargilfield
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    Cargilfield Mathematics ‘Patter’

    There can be many different names for the same operation or calculation in Mathematics, and this can lead to confusion or even anxiety. The quick guide below details some of the more common methods used in Mathematics lessons in the Upper School, and the names by which they are known.

    1. ‘Hats’ (^) and ‘Hops’

      • The hats method is used to multiply decimals.
      • - A hat sign ^ is placed above each digit after the decimal point (and the number of hats noted in brackets).
      • - The decimal points are removed and the numbers are multiplied.
      • - The answer is written down and correct number of hats placed back on top of the digits, working from the right.
      • - The final answer is written without hats.

      Untitled1

      • The hops method is used to divide by decimals.

      Example: 3.13 ÷ 0.02

        

      The decimal point hops two to the right in both numbers, giving 313 ÷ 2.

                                

      perch_rightColBody
      1. 2. ‘Bus stop’ division

      The bus stop method is a simple way to divide; the name refers to the lines drawn in front of and on top of the number to be divided, which form the shape of a bus stop.

      Untitled1

      1. 3. ‘Piggy-back’ division

      To divide by larger numbers, the children are encouraged to use factor pairs.

      Example: 10134 ÷ 18

      The number 10134 would be divided by a pair of factors (3 and 6) which, multiplied, give the product 18 (2 and 9 could also be used).

      Untitled

      1. 4. Napier Bones

      A grid method (named after the 16th century Edinburgh mathematician John Napier) is used for long multiplication.

      Complete the multiplication grid square, then add the columns diagonally, beginning at the bottom right, to get the final answer.

      Untitled

      FMac

      28.2.19

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      Maths

      The Language of Maths!

      Children are used to these terms at Cargilfield

      Read More


      Posted on

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      introTextTolerance and understanding needed
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      I always brace myself for the response to when I ask the question, “what do you know about Islam?” for I never quite know what I might get.  As predicted, the word ISIS is mentioned and I know at that point, that whatever I planned that lesson, will go right out the window.  For this is what I love about teaching Religious Studies.  Not only is it a chance to impart knowledge of the world’s major religions (brag over), but more importantly it is an opportunity to right the misconceptions that are forever being raised by platformssuch as social media and the press, in order to create a “good story”.  

      In a world that is ever changing, one can’t open a newspaper without some reference to religion and as such, tolerance has never been more important.  And whilst history is full of blood and violence where religion is concerned, whether it is the Babylonian wars in Old Testament times (studied in Forms 5 and 6), the Crusades, the martyrdom of Sikhism, the conflict during India’s independence and the Holocaust, each religion has its part to play in the history of religious conflict.  After all, as the saying goes, one man’s terrorist, is another man’s freedom fighter.  There is no doubt that interpretation has a lot to answer to, as does the culture versus religion debate; these latter two are not synonymous and will forever be an ongoing battle to separate.

      And that is why the teaching of religion is now, more than ever, such a vital part of the overall education of the young generation coming though.  Whatever the reasoning behind these events, our children need to understand that at the heart of all faith are the core values – treating others well and living a life in the way that fulfils this.  The very slim minority that don’t do this should not taint the vast majority of those that do, and this is what I hope the children of Cargilfield understand.

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      I always brace myself for the response to when I ask the question, “what do you know about Islam?” for I never quite know what I might get.  As predicted, the word ISIS is mentioned and I know at that point, that whatever I planned that lesson, will go right out the window.  For this is what I love about teaching Religious Studies.  Not only is it a chance to impart knowledge of the world’s major religions (brag over), but more importantly it is an opportunity to right the misconceptions that are forever being raised by platformssuch as social media and the press, in order to create a “good story”.  

      In a world that is ever changing, one can’t open a newspaper without some reference to religion and as such, tolerance has never been more important.  And whilst history is full of blood and violence where religion is concerned, whether it is the Babylonian wars in Old Testament times (studied in Forms 5 and 6), the Crusades, the martyrdom of Sikhism, the conflict during India’s independence and the Holocaust, each religion has its part to play in the history of religious conflict.  After all, as the saying goes, one man’s terrorist, is another man’s freedom fighter.  There is no doubt that interpretation has a lot to answer to, as does the culture versus religion debate; these latter two are not synonymous and will forever be an ongoing battle to separate.

      And that is why the teaching of religion is now, more than ever, such a vital part of the overall education of the young generation coming though.  Whatever the reasoning behind these events, our children need to understand that at the heart of all faith are the core values – treating others well and living a life in the way that fulfils this.  The very slim minority that don’t do this should not taint the vast majority of those that do, and this is what I hope the children of Cargilfield understand.

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      Religion

      Importance of teaching religion

      Tolerance and understanding needed

      Read More


      Posted on